pkgdown 1.3.0

Photo by jackmac34

We’re happy to announce that pkgdown 1.3.0 is now available on CRAN. pkgdown is designed to make it quick and easy to build a website for your package. Here, we’ll highlight some of the new features, and improvements in this version. Note, this blog post describes pkgdown 1.2.0 and 1.3.0, because we accidentally released 1.3.0 instead of 1.2.1. For a full list of changes, please see the NEWS.

New features

The new deploy_site_github() function can be used to automatically deploy your package website to GitHub Pages with continuous integration systems (like travis). Setup details can be found here. We are gradually moving all tidyverse sites to use this process so that they’re always up-to-date.

build_favicon() auto-detects the location of your package logo, and runs it through the https://realfavicongenerator.net API to build a complete set of favicons with different sizes.

Lastly, users with limited internet connectivity can now expressly disable pkgdown’s internet usage by setting options(pkgdown.internet = FALSE).

Front-end improvements

All third-party resources are now fetched from a single CDN and are given an SRI hash. The package version displayed in the navbar now has class="version", which should make it easier to customize its appearance. The default footer now displays the version of pkgdown used to build the site. You’ll need to run this once and check in the generated files.

Rd translation

  • rd2html() is now exported to facilitate creation of translation reprexes.
  • Invalid tags now generate more informative errors.
  • \usage{} now supports qualified functions, eliminating Unknown call: :: errors.

Again, these are just some of the updates, so please be sure to see the change log for a more exhaustive inventory.

Acknowledgements

A big thank you goes out to the 59 people who contributed to this release: @alexpghayes, @aqualogy, @aravind-j, @arilamstein, @ArtemSokolov, @BarkleyBG, @bastistician, @batpigandme, @Bisaloo, @BruceZhaoR, @cderv, @daviddoret, @DavisVaughan, @dongzhuoer, @Dripdrop12, @Fazendaaa, @GeoBosh, @goldingn, @GregorDeCillia, @hadley, @HenrikBengtsson, @HughParsonage, @IndrajeetPatil, @jameslamb, @jayhesselberth, @jennybc, @JiaxiangBU, @jimhester, @jmgirard, @JohnMount, @jpzhangvincent, @KasperSkytte, @kenahoo, @klmr, @koheiw, @kopperud, @krlmlr, @liao961120, @lionel-, @lrutter, @maelle, @maurolepore, @maxheld83, @md0u80c9, @mllg, @mrchypark, @mvinaixa, @nbenn, @pat-s, @pbreheny, @peterdesmet, @petermeissner, @Robinlovelace, @strengejacke, @thiloklein, @venelin, @wenjie2wang, @yihui, and @yonicd.

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